HORSE FEATHERS CELEBRATES
10-YEAR ANNIVERSARY WITH
4-CASSETTE BOX SET, U.S. TOUR DATES

KRS ARCHIVES, VOLUME 1 COMPILES GROUP’S ENTIRE
KILL ROCK STARS OUTPUT, OUT APRIL 22

TOUR OF INTIMATE CLUBS FEATURES FAN-SUBMITTED SET LISTS

“All exquisite grace and charm.”—NPR Music

“Horse Feathers elevate themselves above the fray with a rare combination of simplicity and intricacy.”—SPIN

In celebration of Horse Feathers’ 10-year anniversary as a band, the group’s entire Kill Rock Stars catalog—2008’s House With No Home, 2010’s Thistled Spring and 2012’s Cynic’s New Year, as well as the 7-inch singles “Cascades” and Nirvana cover “Drain You”—is being reissued as a four-cassette box set, KRS Archives, Volume 1, out April 22. The collection, which features original artwork by long-time Horse Feathers collaborator Lloyd Winter, also includes five previously unreleased tracks. Among the rarities included in the box set is the band’s cover of Nirvana’s “Drain You,” which is now streaming at http://bit.ly/1fboxWT.

The Portland, OR-based group, led by singer-songwriter Justin Ringle and longtime collaborator, violinist Nathan Crockett, will also mark their 10-year anniversary with an all-acoustic tour across the eastern U.S. throughout April. As an added bonus for fans, the group is accepting setlist requests via their Facebook page. Click Tour above for dates.

Horse Feathers’ most recent release, Cynic’s New Year, topped the Billboard Folk Chart at #23 and the Billboard Heatseekers Chart at #29. Broadening the group’s sonic palette to include 11 musicians playing instruments including drums, French horn, piano, bells, upright bass and banjo, the record was praised by Pitchfork for its “flourishes of piano, reeds, banjo, and horns…all of which are gracefully absorbed into the band’s signature sound” while USA Today hailed it as “a delight from start to finish” and the Utne Reader called it “ornate and lyrically haunting.”

Horse Feathers was formed after Justin Ringle moved to Portland in 2004. Having played with rock bands in his native Idaho, Ringle found himself drawn to a softer, more folk-based sound in the Pacific Northwest and began combining stark lyrics (he cites Cormac McCarthy as an influence) with subtle acoustic arrangements.